Cycling Power to Weight Ratio Calculator

What is PWR / How to calculate?

The Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) is the standard that most cyclists use to measure their fitness and improvement. It is easily calculated by dividing your weight (in kilograms) by your average power output (in watts).

Most cyclists use their FTP for their power input to calculate their PWR for an hour (or a standard criterium). Once you input your weight and FTP, check the table below to see how you stack up against different race categories and the pros.

STEP 1 - Convert weight from lbs to kgs

If you already know your weight in kg, then skip to step 2.
If not, then enter your weight in lbs in the box below.

Weight (lbs)

You can use up to 2 decimal places

Calculated weight in kg: {{ (lbsValue / 2.2) | number:1}}

Insert this number in step 2 below.

STEP 2 - Input your weight (kg) & power (watts)

Weight (kg)

You can use up to 2 decimal places

Average Power (watts)

This is your average power over a sustained time (ex 5min, 1 hr, etc)

STEP 3 - Your Calculated Power to Weight Ratio

PWR: {{ (wattValue / weightValue) | number:2 }}

Looks like you need to train a bit harder if you want to start racing! Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Welcome to the Cat-5's! This the category for entry-level racers. Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Welcome to the Cat-4's! Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Welcome to the Cat-3's! Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Welcome to the Cat-2's! This is the entrance level for local elite level racing. Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Congrats on making it to Cat-1 level! This is the top of the domestic amateur level and you're super close to pro-level. Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Congrats, you have the power to make it as a domestic pro! Check out the table below to see where you stack up!
Well look at you Mr. International Pro! Check out the table below to see yourself at the top of the food chain!
Your FTP is abnormally high.. Check the FTP chart below for different time intervals to see where you stack up!

RESULTS - What do I do with this data?

Take a look at the table below to see where you line up. What constitutes a good power to weight ratio changes based on the length of the effort, so be sure to check different efforts (5s, 1 min, 1 hour) to see how you stack up against other cycling categories.

*Note* The data in this table is only rough estimates. These values are constantly changing, and may vary depending on your country/location. These numbers should only be used as a rough ballpark for comparison and nothing more.

Race Category PWR Table (Men)
Rider Level 5s 1 min 5 min 60 min
International pro 21.6~ 10.5~ 6.7~ 5.6~
Domestic pro 20~21.6 9.8~10.5 6~6.7 5.1~5.6
Elite Cat 1 18.5~20 9~9.8 5.5~6 4.5~5.1
Elite Cat 2 17~18.5 8.5~9 4.9~5.5 4.1~4.5
Cat 3 15~17 7.6~8.5 4.1~4.9 3.4~4.1
Cat 4 13.5~15 7~7.6 3.5~4.1 2.9~3.4
Cat 5 11.5~13.5 6.3~7 2.9~3.5 2.4~2.9
Amateur <11.5 <6.3 <2.9 <2.4
Race Category PWR Table (Women)
Rider Level 5s 1 min 5 min 60 min
International pro 17.5~ 8.5~ 5.8~ 5~
Domestic pro 16.3~17.5 8~8.5 5.3~5.8 4.5~5
Elite Cat 1 15~16.3 7.4~8 4.7~5.3 4~4.5
Elite Cat 2 13.7~15 6.9~7.4 4.2~4.7 3.5~4
Cat 3 12.2~13.7 6.2~6.9 3.5~4.2 2.9~3.5
Cat 4 10.9~12.2 5.7~6.2 3~3.5 2.5~2.9
Cat 5 9.6~10.9 5.2~5.7 2.4~3 2~2.5
Amateur <9.6 <5.2 <2.4 <2

Recommended Power Meters

Are you looking for a new power meter to help you train with power? Here are some recommendations.

Favero Assioma Pedal Based Power Meter

See price on Amazon

Stages Power Crankset

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Garmin Vector S3 Pedal Based Power Meter

See price on Amazon